“Hell Bound Train” review on blogcritics.com

Delta Moon, Hell Bound Train

By Jon Sobel
blogcritics.com

“You’ll never get to heaven on a hellbound train,” singer Tom Gray croaks in this CD’s opening number, whose rather obvious message blossoms into a pungent cautionary tale. Delta Moon churns out a thick blend of Chicago slide-guitar blues and Southern soul-rock, and Mark Johnson plays a mean slide guitar, but it’s the pair’s focused songwriting that makes this disc a keeper. “Are you lonely for me, babe, like I’m lonely for you?” sighs the character in “Lonely” – “I hold onto something, a drink or a girl / ‘Cause I feel like I’m falling off the edge of the world.”

The music is as emotional as it is economical and tough, with time-worn themes – stories about jailbirds, drifters, and dashed hopes – couched in powerful and sometimes poetic imagery. At the same time it’s possible to enjoy this music with your reptile brain, which, if it’s anything like mine, will dig the slouching beats and growling guitars.

The band nods to rootsy blues with a reverent acoustic cover of Fred McDowell’s classic “You Got To Move,” while “Stuck in Carolina” gets stuck in its jerky one-chord groove for a full five minutes and works just fine, thanks in part to a nifty sax solo by guest Kenyon Carter. “Ain’t No Train” is another chunky lo-fi jam, compacted into three and a half growling minutes, with the guitar evoking soul-music horn riffs, and “Ghost in My Guitar” is that rarity, a song about playing music which – mostly because of its a haunting chorus – doesn’t make you want to skip to the next track to find something less self-indulgent or self-referential. Humility found in surprising places – like in that song’s message about the mysteries of inspiration – is one of the strains in Delta Moon’s music that lofts it above and beyond the basic blues.

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